An interview on all things weird, wild and wonderful with Mr Loveday | By Eeman Y and Olivia R

Backchat: Do you believe in aliens?

Mr Loveday: I do believe there will be alien life discovered at some point. I’m very hopeful! There’s something amazing called the Fermi Paradox that you should, every reader, should go and find out about. It’s something I think about a lot, it freaks me out.

If you were a child at Hogwarts who would your best friend be?

I think I would have been friends with (…) I wouldn’t want to be with the core group! I suppose Neville seems like a nice guy, definitely! The reason why I wouldn’t want to hang out with the core gang is they’re always getting into trouble and death-defying feats. I wouldn’t want to fight snakes and defeat evil wizards.

There’s this TV character called Jessica Fletcher, who solved murders every time she went on holiday and everyone says, who on earth would want to be Jessica Fletcher’s friend? You’d end up dying or being arrested around her.

If you could describe yourself with one noun, verb and adjective, what would they be?

Now you’re testing my English abilities. (…) Enthusiastic. A noun, a tree! And swaying. Yep! An enthusiastically swaying tree.

On the spectrum, what is your inspiration in life?

Okay, quite a few. One of the main guys at the top because he has just been writing some articles I’ve been reading, is a guy called Archbishop Desmond Tutu. He was a South-African freedom fighter, essentially, who was very important in trying to put together South Africa after their difficulties with apartheid.

What do you think is the best gift you could ever give somebody?

Your time, I guess! Making time for other people is something we really struggle to do in the modern world. We are not taught to do it anymore. We text, we swipe. We don’t do much else in human interaction.

Thoughts on social media and phones in school…

Well you may remember an assembly I did on Internet Safety Day and my line of argument is, from an evolutionary point of view, our brains aren’t very good at coping with new shiny gadgets… they make us freak out. I’m very interested and concerned basically about the impact social media will be having on us long-term. Like our friendship circles, or how we see ourselves. Our self-worth and how stressed we are, always having to check or be exciting.

There’s a lot of pressure when you’re in your twenties after when you’re at university and getting jobs… seeing other people being successful and you think that you’re not being successful. In terms of mobile phones in school, I think you guys will have the rest of your lives to be hooked up to devices. I think six hours in a day while you’re trying to study things, wouldn’t be a bad thing not to have your phone with you.

On the spectrum that is life, where would you place yourself and why?

The spectrum of life? (…) It could be a really exciting period.

New Beginnings, An Interview with Mrs H-T | By Jess C-J and Lexy D

An interview with Mrs H-T on starting a new job in an new environment.

What made you first become interested in Chemistry?

I was quite good at it in secondary school and I found it quite easy. I also like Games, but when it came to A levels I didn’t have a choice for Games or PE or any of that. So I picked Chemistry, Biology and Maths and just stuck with it because I’ve always found it reasonably straight forward.

What is it like starting somewhere new where you don’t know anyone?

Pretty awful! I was at my previous school for 10 years, so I was the kind of person that people would come to when they were new. To answer questions like, “Where do you get your photocopying done?”’ or “Who does this?” and “What’s that?” I had moments of complete doubt of what I was doing, why was I starting somewhere new and it’s stupid little things, not how to teach or how to do the important bits of my job, but it’s how to get photocopying done or what do I do if this happens. It’s just really quite scary, but after about 3 weeks it didn’t matter. It was all perfect.

How easy is it to adapt when you come to a new school?

Schools are all the same. Well, there’s little intricacies that are different, but effectively schools are all the same: people come in, they learn, they go. So once you’ve got the basics of that, it’s quite straightforward and, yes, I would say within the first month I felt a lot more settled. When we had our first staff meeting we were asked for anecdotes about what made us feel happy and what made me feel happy was that it felt like I’d been here forever — in a good way. I was settled, I was happy. Every day is a learning day, so every day I find out something new, but I would say within a month it was quite easy to be settled.

‘I feel like I’ve been here forever – but in a good way’

Mrs H-T

Do you think it’s harder to contribute ideas when you are newer than other people?

It goes both ways, really. I am quite happy to contribute ideas, but that all comes from being comfortable in my environment. I think if I was having a different year and I was still wary about what was going on or who’s who, I probably wouldn’t contribute as many ideas and I definitely wouldn’t start an equestrian club! I think because the school has helped me settle so quickly it’s just been quite easy.

What is the best thing about the High School?

Well, there’s lots of best things. I think it’s the atmosphere because everybody wants to learn and it’s not just the girls that want to learn, the teachers want to learn how to be better teachers to make the girls learn better. I think it’s just that everybody works together as one big team. Even if you’ve had a little bit of a falling out with somebody, it’s fixed, you move on. It’s great. So I think the atmosphere is the best thing.

Do you have any advice for students that are about to start university or get a job next year?

This school is very good for preparing you for the future but not scaring you. I think my best piece of advice if I was going to leave and go off to university is to do everything that you want to do but challenge yourself at the same time. Don’t just sit back and do something because it’s easy; don’t sit back because it might be fun; do it as a challenge. Do it because you want to, but get it all done and dusted and out of the way so when you know what you want to do for the rest of your life you can get on and do it.

Finally, what is the best thing about chemistry?

The best thing about chemistry has to be that it’s a practical subject and it’s indoors where it’s warm. My other choice was teaching PE where it’s cold! So you can do lots of practicals and even if you don’t like it you’ll find an aspect about it that you do because it’s vast and clearly is the best science!

Image Link: https://www.nunii-laboratoire.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/shutterstock_1241820865.jpg (03/04/21)

An Interview with Mr Donaldson on Time | Conducted and Transcribed by Eeman

Backchat: Which is your favourite time period to teach and why?

Mr D: Easy! The making of Modern Britain from 1951 to 2007 because it’s really relevant to students’ lives and I like how they can relate to it and it also brings in politics and economics. Also, probably because it’s the story of my family; my dad, my mum, my grandad lived through this. I’ve found that when teaching history it’s important to relate it back to them because it’s such an abstract subject.

B: If you could talk to your past self for exactly one minute what would you say?

Mr D: Blimey! I think I would say you worry too much. People plan and they never work out how they’re supposed to, but that’s sort of how life works. If I went back to talk to myself as a teenager, I would say stop worrying about what might happen, what you need to do and to relax a little bit because you haven’t got a lot of control over things. As you get older you realise that it matters less what other people might think of you than you believe when you’re growing up. You’ve just got to be yourself!

B: If you could choose to be immortal and have all the time in the world, would you take it?

Mr D: No. Because… I think I’d get bored of it all eventually. This might sound quite dark, but I think one day I’d just like to sleep and leave it all behind. That’s gonna happen anyway at some point, but I just feel like life is so hard and tiring, although I’d like a good innings, at some point I would want it to stop. To avoid boredom as well is difficult, in some ways I’m accepting of the fact that this is temporary and you’re only here for a short time…and that’s fine.

B: What do you think has been the most significant change in the world?

Mr D: I guess today you would sort of say climate change, but in my lifetime the biggest change has been… technology. When I was at university, writing my dissertation, I did it on a typewriter! Computers were something that weren’t common back then, so I think the internet has been a massive change. As a teacher you notice it more, but life in general has become so hectic and busy. Perhaps that’s me saying it as an adult, whereas a child you have more time to daydream. I think lots of people would argue life is more complex now. I think the modern world has become a very busy place to work in.

B: Which period would you like to live in the most?

Mr D: I’m quite happy with now, because that’s where I am. You might get some history teachers that have favourite time periods they would love to visit, but I think I’m quite accepting of the fact that I’m around now. I would love to go to the future, but a bit of history I’d go back to… maybe just for a day.

B: If you could time travel would you choose to go into the past or the future?

Mr D: Future. That’s the great unknown isn’t it? I already know about the past, but the future I have no idea about so it would be quite interesting! Maybe about sort of 50 years ahead. I’d love to travel around space a bit, I think that would be really cool! It’s so gigantic and vast and we’re in such a tiny contained part of the universe, to see it in all its vastness… Because life is actually quite claustrophobic. So maybe a bit of space travel??

B: What do you think humans should aim to do at least once in their lifetime?

Mr D: I have tried skydiving, but I’m not sure it’s something you have to do in your lifetime. It’s such a vast question, but there’s obvious thing like everyone should fall in love. Mostly I think it’s the little things you do every day that everyone should experience, for example, saying hello to your neighbour or having a chat with your kids… It’s the little things like that, that I think add up to make a massive difference. The idea that if you can help someone just a little bit is… I mean if everybody did that the world would be a much nicer place.

B: Where do you see yourself in ten years’ time?

Mr D: Ten years’ time… Not teaching! I’m not one of those people who will have the energy or passion to do it anymore. So, I would probably be somewhere doing a bit of travelling… Back to New Zealand, which is fabulous! Or wandering around Scotland a little bit, exploring. Just spending time doing things I actually want to do! Once you get a job, it steals a lot of time from you and in ten years I will have done my bit in teaching and you lot will have had enough from me. I want to still be young enough to actually put effort into my travelling and have a proper go at it… not on a cruise with a pension and those group coaches. That’s not me!

B: If you had all the time to change one thing about the world, what would it be and why?

Mr D: I’m not sure what it is I would do…. But it would be along the lines of helping as many people as possible. Like reversing climate change, or curing cancer, or making sure coronavirus didn’t get out. Something that would make the most difference to the most amount of people as possible…. That is a massive question!